点心ガイド点心ガイド

点心ガイド

The traditions and cultural practices surrounding dim sum make it one of the most interesting ways to explore Chinese food and culture in Singapore. Schedule an afternoon experiencing dim sum into your itinerary for Singapore and you won’t be disappointed!

The term ‘dim sum’ means ‘touch your heart’, which is the intended effect of the many dishes that you’ll encounter while enjoying this traditional Chinese cuisine. Dim sum is served much like Spanish tapas, with bite-sized portions of several dishes to be shared around the table. While traditionally eaten during the day, in modern times it's also common to have dim sum at night.

Among the dishes you can expect to sample at a dim sum meal are char sui bao (steamed or baked buns stuffed with barbequed pork), siu mai (steamed pork or shrimp dumplings), har gau (steamed shrimp dumplings), ham sui gau (glutinous rice dumplings with pork), and xiao long bau (steamed pork dumplings served with soy sauce, vinegar and shredded ginger).

Dim sum houses first started in Canton, as simple food for laborers and travelers. Many restaurants still serve dim sum in the traditional fashion, where carts of different dim sum dishes are wheeled around the tables and customers point out the ones they want. Others have paper checklist menus, where you order by marking the checkbox next to dishes you'd like to try.

One of the most well-known dim sum restaurants in Singapore is the Michelin-starred Hong Kong based Tim Ho Wan, but expect long queues most of the time. This isn’t a meal to be rushed, but to be enjoyed with good company – sampling the many varieties of dishes available and indulging in a few cups of Chinese tea.

Indeed, dim sum is tied inextricably with yum cha, which is drinking tea. You’ll be served tea when you sit down. When you’re serving tea, serve others at the table before yourself. If you turn the lid of the teapot upside down or leave the lid slightly off the pot, it’s a sign to your water that you would like a refill.

The traditional way to thank someone for filling your tea is to tap the table lightly. This practice comes from a an old tale that says that a Chinese emperor once went to a tea house dressed as a commoner. When he poured his friend some tea, the friend wanted to thank him but couldn’t have bowed as this would have revealed that he was the emperor. As a gesture of appreciation and respect, he tapped his fingers on the table.

シンガポールの中華料理や文化は、点心にまつわる伝統や慣習を通して、楽しく学ぶことができます。シンガポールですることリストに、点心体験を加えてみてはいかがでしょうか。がっかりなんてことにはならないはずです!

「点心」とは、「心に触れる」という意味。たくさんの料理でもてなすということです。点心は、スペイン料理のタパスとよく似ており、一口サイズの料理を友人や家族で分け合います。点心のお店が最初にできたのは広東省で、当時は労働者や旅行者に出された簡素な料理でした。伝統的なレストランの中には、点心をカートに乗せて店内を回り、カートから好きな料理を選ぶという注文スタイルのところもあります。こうしたスタイル以外のレストランでは、メニューを見て好きな料理に印を付け、注文します。

点心文化は、お茶文化とも密接に関係しています。点心には、お茶を飲む「飲茶」がつきものだからです。席に着くと、まずお茶が出されます。お茶を注ぐときは、自分の分よりも先に、テーブルにいる他の人達にお茶を注ぎましょう。ティーポットの蓋を逆さまにして乗せておくか、蓋を少しずらしておくと、お湯を注いでほしいという合図になります。お茶を注いでもらったときは、テーブルを軽くたたきます。これは、注いでくれてありがとう、という伝統的な感謝の表し方です。

おすすめの点心は、チャーシューパオ(バーベキューポーク入りの肉まん)やシュウマイ(肉やエビの一部を包んで蒸したもの)や、ハーガオ(エビ蒸し餃子)、ハムスイガオ(豚肉の入ったもち米の餃子)、小籠包(醤油、酢、生姜の千切りと一緒に出される豚肉の蒸し餃子)、カブケーキや人参ケーキなどです。

点心は日中に食べるのが一般的です。シンガポールには、数多くの点心レストランがいたるところにあります。最も有名なレストランは、ミシュラン星を獲得した香港のティム・ホー・ワンで、いつも長い行列ができています。点心は急いで食べる料理ではなく、中国茶飲んでいろいろな料理を食べ比べながら、親しい人と楽しむ料理です。

この他にも、アイスクリームやデザート、一押しのローカルフードなど、シンガポールの美味しい食べ物はいろいろとあります。ぜひチェックしてみてください!